Slow Progress

We are proceeding with this giant remodel project very, very slowly. That means we end up doing things like this: The new landscaping and gravel next to our deck.P1050642

Or this larger area below our deck that’s also landscaped and rocked up.P1050643

It’s pitch black in these pictures, because it’s 9:30 on a workday and we’re still working on our way-behind remodel. Blegh.P1050644

The bright side is that I’ve found and started using Tomsplanner.com; a pretty helpful free project schedule creator. I have a background in project scheduling, so it may be more technical than a typical DIYer would prefer.

schedule

It allows you to color code tasks (so I can tell what I’m responsible for vs. Michael) and you can just drag the bars to change them. The bad news is, we can really tell how slow we’re progressing.

We aren’t making much progress on the basement, but we have gotten some outdoor tasks done.

The first project was digging a giant hole for the egress window.3 feet

Emma helped by continuously dropping her toys into the giant pit.     narrow

The excavation went well, all things considered. We abused some 5 gallon buckets, and eventually started using this pulley system.pully systemIt ended up 4 feet by 101″ wide (8.5 feet) and about 7 feet deep.final sizeWe used a 72″ gray Rockwell elite egress window from Summit Contractor Supply. It was $952. That’s about $400 less than most retailers, but it was still not cheap. The good news is it will last as long as the house. Plus it looked adorably like a covered wagon before install.

wagonMounting the well was very easy,  just 12 concrete wedge anchors into the block wall.bolting

We leveled and repaired the erosion on the back of the house with the leftover dirt piles. It ended up about a foot deep for a good 50 square foot area. Michael is a champion mover of dirt.

built-up

After creating the giant hole, we marked the window rough opening, custom ordered the casement window, and now we’re waiting for the window to arrive.

Well, by waiting I mean pouring concrete slabs and working on the deck 🙂

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Progressing right along 🙂

Drawing Board

We introduced our plans for the basement bathroom here. After actually tearing the walls out, we found out that Plan A will not work :/ We were planning on having a doorless shower.Like the image below,you would walk past the glass panel to enter the shower from the left.

Shower Layout

After demo, we found that the entire width of the bathroom will be 7 ft, not wide enough for the glass and an entrance.

One to plan Beta.

We considered a two person shower the full width of the room. The door would have this layout.

Custom_Two_Panel_and_Frameless_Glass_Shower_Door_2009_051but the glass estimates (had to be custom at that width) were $1800 to $2100… our entire budget.

We also considered make the bathroom narrower. 5 by 8  is a very standard bathroom size, and that makes the bedroom 12 feet wide. Our new layout for the basement would be this:

Basement layout

But that would make the den cramped,and it’s the most-used room down there.

We decided to frame-in a standard 5 ft shower and leave the 20 inches to the right (next to the toilet) as a small storage area.

Basement bathroom layout

I’d like the storage to look as much like this as possible.

Bathroom Storage

After demo and modifying our plan, it’s time for procurement.

We got the floor tile, shower drain, and grout from the Tile Shop (40% off black Friday sale, yay)  The tile is porcelain 12 x 24  ‘Burma Negro’ at $3.89 a square foot. It was over budget,but it is super awesome. We spent $945 on the tile materials for both the bathroom and mudroom. 1/3 of that will be used in the bathroom. This picture is from the tile installed in a  mudroom at Fat Hydrangea blog with London Fog grout.Burma Negro Tile

We grabbed this sink (complete with faucet) off Craigslist for $100.

Kohler Sink

The mirrors (KOLJA,$20), lighting (BASISK, $20), and glass shelves (BAREN, $30) were picked up at IKEA.basisk-ceiling-track--spotlights__0138856_PE298668_S4

A rain shower head came from a local Homegoods-style store ($30):

showerhead

And the ceiling light/vent  (Hunter/Ventura Exhaust Bathroom Fan) was $54 from Homeclick.com.

Ventura+Exhaust+Fan

The shower door was our big-ticket item. We wanted a frameless pivot-door shower. The Dreamline SHDR-20597210S was $776.

Shower Door

Option B (Dreamline SHDR-21587610) was $542 after a handy 10% discount.

vitreo-2

We chose the second, which was $542 beans at Faucetdirect.com . We went about 10% over budget for the shower door, but we’re still doing great overall.

We still need the wall tile, shower pan materials, and miscellaneous hooks, plumbing, electrical outlets, etc. The shower pan materials will be at least a hundred dollars over budget, but that’s what that $345 buffer is for 🙂

Item budget spent
shower door 475 542
floor tile 320 285
sink 100 100
plumbing 100 35
ceiling vent 55 55
glass shelves 50 30
Mirrors 45 20
vanity light 30 20
Total 1175 1087
shower surround tile 500
tile materials 155
wall hooks,etc. 50
outlets, light switches, etc. 25
buffer 345
Total 2250

DIY Headboard

We dumped our furniture into the Master bedroom over two years ago, and it hasn’t moved since. We also never hung our pictures 🙂Original Layout

The only thing that bothered me with the layout was the reading chair. There was no where to put my drink, a blanket, Emma’s chew toy when she won’t stop giving it to me, nothing. Plus it’s right next to the bathroom.

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And so: Kapow, new layout.

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Now I can put my drink on the dresser while reading, and there’s even a table to use  for charging phones (no more windowsill, yay).

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I like it.P1050504

We still had the giant blank wall above the bed, though. P1050503We decided to flagrantly steal this blogger’s idea and create a headboard out of 1 by 6s.

We trimmed, sanded, and stained 4 poplar 1x6s with Miniwax Early American stain. Instead of the original blogger’s Command strips, we decided to use a router and a keyhole bit to save about $15. P1050519

Since we didn’t use the Command strips, we had to place all 8 keyholes perfectly,hit studs perfectly, and mount the screws perfectly. As you can guess, it was finicky. I would go with the Command strips next time 🙂 $48 of poplar later, we had this:

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My favorite change is moving the bed, we actually notice the view much more now.P1050542